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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2021  |  Volume : 10  |  Issue : 4  |  Page : 414-420

Abdominal tuberculosis: Clinical profile and outcome


1 Department of GI Surgery, School of Digestive and Liver Diseases, Institute of Postgraduate Medical Education and Research, Kolkata, West Bengal, India
2 Department of Hepatology, School of Digestive and Liver Diseases, Institute of Postgraduate Medical Education and Research, Kolkata, West Bengal, India
3 Department of Gastroenterology, School of Digestive and Liver Diseases, Institute of Postgraduate Medical Education and Research, Kolkata, West Bengal, India
4 Department of GI Pathology, School of Digestive and Liver Diseases, Institute of Postgraduate Medical Education and Research, Kolkata, West Bengal, India
5 Department of GI Radiology, School of Digestive and Liver Diseases, Institute of Postgraduate Medical Education and Research, Kolkata, West Bengal, India

Correspondence Address:
Arkadeep Dhali
Department of Gastroenterology, School of Digestive and Liver Diseases, Institute of Postgraduate Medical Education and Research, Kolkata - 700 020, West Bengal
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/ijmy.ijmy_195_21

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Background : Tuberculosis (TB) is common form of communicable disease in India. Abdominal TB is one of the most common yet misdiagnosed forms of extrapulmonary TB. It is missed due to its similarity to other conditions such as Crohn's disease and nonspecific clinical presentation. Methods: Medical records of 317 patients who were diagnosed with abdominal TB from August 2015 to December 2020 were reviewed retrospectively from our prospectively maintained database. Results: Among 317 patients, 167 (52.7%) were male. Median age of presentation was 45 (8–85) years. Luminal involvement was seen in most of the patients (n = 157, 49.5%), followed by peritoneal (n = 63, 19.8%), mixed (n = 42, 13.2%), solid visceral (n = 30, 9.4%), and nodal (n = 25, 7.8%) involvement. Two hundred and sixty-one (82.3%) showed complete response. Seven (2.2%) patients died and 5 (1.6%) patients lost to follow-up. Median duration of treatment was 28 (25–52) weeks. Drug-induced liver injury was identified in 30 (9.5%) patients. Median follow-up duration was 32 (1–70) months. Conclusion: Abdominal TB is quite a diagnostic challenge due its vague clinical symptoms, nonspecific radiological features, and poor sensitivity and specificity of diagnostic tests. Hence, clinicians should have a high index of suspicion to diagnose and treat this treatable yet lethal condition promptly. Most cases respond very well to medical management and a small fraction requires surgical intervention if diagnosed early.


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